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Greek Yogurt

Orange Icon  Greek Yogurt

Orange Icon  Greek Yogurt

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Submitted by: Susan Becker

Prep Time: 8 Hours

Cook Time: 0 Seconds

Servings: 8

I can't always find full-fat organic greek yogurt at the store. Here is an easy way to turn regular yogurt (a carb) into greek yogurt (a protein).

  • 1 yogurt, plain, full-fat, organic

Line a large wire strainer with a coffee filter or a couple layers of cheesecloth. Place the strainer over a large bowl. Scoop all the yogurt into the lined strainer. Cover with plastic wrap or a clean cloth and refrigerate at least 8 hours, or overnight. The liquid whey (which contains most of the milk sugar) will drain into the bowl. You might have to periodically pour out the liquid, depending on the size of your bowl. When it is done, I just put it back into the original (cleaned) container. The volume will be reduced by at least half.

2 ounces greek yogurt = 1 protein

It is important to read the label carefully when buying greek yogurt. Some brands are "greek style" yogurt, which can mean that it is not strained, but it has added thickeners. "Greek style" yogurt usually has more carbs than genuine greek yogurt. I have found that the home-strained version has the most protein and least carbs.

Here is a link listing some ideas for ways to use the whey, rather than just pouring it down the drain: http://www.salad-in-a-jar.com/recipes-with-yogurt/18-ways-to-use-whey-a-by-product-of-greek-yogurt. I am a protein type, so the whey has too many carbs for me to consume, but the site has some non-cooking ideas, too.